Davis, Markert, Nickerson Lecture on Academic and Intellectual Freedom

Davis, Markert, Nickerson Lecture on Academic and Intellectual Freedom

Davis Markert Nickerson

Markert Nickerson Davis

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Read more about Davis, Markert and Nickerson here.

marcrotenbergji1   Marc Rotenberg – Bio   

Marc Rotenberg is President and Executive Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) in Washington, DC. He teaches information privacy and open government law at Georgetown University Law Center and frequently testifies before Congress on emerging privacy and civil liberties issues. He testified before the 9-11 Commission on “Security and Liberty: Protecting Privacy, Preventing Terrorism.” He has served on several national and international advisory panels. He has authored many amicus briefs for federal and state courts. He is a founding board member and former Chair of the Public Interest Registry, which manages the .ORG domain. He is editor of “The Privacy Law Sourcebook” (EPIC 2004) and “Privacy and Human Rights” (EPIC 2006) and co-editor of “Privacy in the Modern Age: The Search for Solutions” (The New Press 2015) and (with Anita Allen) “Privacy Law and Society” (West 2016). He currently serves on expert panels for the National Academies of Science and the OECD Directorate for Science, Technology, and Innovation. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Stanford Law School and received an LLM in International and Comparative Law. He served as Counsel to Senator Patrick J. Leahy on the Senate Judiciary Committee after graduation from law school. He is the recipient of several awards, including the World Technology Award in Law, the American Lawyer Award for Top Lawyers Under 45, the Norbert Weiner Award for Social and Professional Responsibility, and the Vicennial medal from Georgetown University for distinguished service. He was named one of the top lawyers in America 2013-2014 by Lawdragon. Georgetown Law bio – Marc Rotenberg. Wikipedia bio – Marc Rotenberg logo_transparent

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University of Michigan Senate Assembly Resolution

Adopted November 19,1990:

The faculty of the University of Michigan affirms that academic and intellectual freedom are fundamental values for a university in a free society. They form the foundation of the rights of free inquiry, free expression and free dissent that are necessary for the life of the university. The faculty recognizes that such rights are human creations, the product of both the reasoned actions and the deep-seated commitments of women and men. When such actions and commitments are set in human institutions, people may secure for themselves and for others, in the present and the future, the enjoyment of those rights. We also recognize that these values and the rights they imply are vulnerable to the fads, fashions, social movements and mass fears that threaten to still dissent and to censure carriers of unpopular ideas. Such was the case in 1954 when the University of Michigan suspended three faculty members and subsequently dismissed two of them. We deeply regret the failure of the University community to protect the fundamental values of intellectual freedom at that time. It is to guard against a repetition of those events and to protect the fundamental freedoms of those who come after us that we make this resolution today. The protection of academic and intellectual freedoms requires a constant reminder of their value and vulnerability. To provide for that reminder, the Faculty of the University of Michigan hereby resolves to establish an Annual Senate Lecture on Academic and on Intellectual Freedom, to be named: The University of Michigan Senate’s Davis, Markert, Nickerson Lecture on Academic and Intellectual Freedom.